Tuesday, June 27, 2006

You Will Be There

Peter Rempel is back in fighting form, with this public service announcement.

But seriously folks: with the growing government and corporate presence at the high holiday of homosexualism, there comes also the increasing element of coercion: go to the parade, march in it, work on the float, do something with your volun-told services, or you'll be fired. Or not be promoted. Or not get your bonus.

Before you know it, attendance at these parades will be as strictly enforced as attendance at the old May Day parades in the old Soviet Union.

Show up. Or else.

3 comments:

Joanne (True Blue) said...

I wonder what would have happened if the guy with the banana had been dressed up as Allah instead of Jesus?

Dave T. said...

And what evidence do you have that anyone has been coerced into being in the parade?

Oh, right. None.

Loyalist said...

Dave T:

Rarely is such coercion overt.

But if it is overt, it is usually not expressed so bluntly.

Anyone who's worked in any organization of any size knows that people's reputations and careers are made and unmade by the contents of their unwritten file--that collection of firsthand personal observations, secondhand reports, and thirdhand gossip that follows them about throughout the organization and the profession.

If an employee speaks out openly against the company participating in such an event, or even just grumbles about it to his co-workers, his complaints always find a way back to his bosses.

And they start thinking that he's not a team player, a bigot, a troublemaker, a loose cannon, and worse.

Every interaction with his superiors and decision made about his position in the organization will be coloured by the unwritten file.

He'll find out soon enough, that he has to go along to get along.

And if his department is expected to have a good showing at any such event favoured by the bosses--not just the pride parade, but even the office golf tournament--it will be made known that his attendance is expected.

And if he doesn't attend, he may find himself facing trouble he never anticipated.

He will have no recourse, because he will never have been formally accused of anything, nor will he have committed an actual offence.

But he will be forever marked by the unwritten file.