Sunday, December 04, 2005

Jack Layton: Trade Warrior

The law of unintended consequences will kick in if Jack Layton has his way on the softwood lumber tariff dispute: those greedy oil-soaked globe-warming Albertans will get even richer!

NDP Leader Jack Layton says Canada should consider taxing energy exports to the United States if Washington doesn't lift its tariffs on softwood lumber imports.

Layton said trade sanctions might be necessary if the U.S. doesn't dump the import duties that have siphoned $5 billion so far from Canadian producers of softwood lumber.

Layton focused on the softwood lumber issue Saturday during campaign stops in British Columbia, the province hit hardest by the dispute.

"We favour a polite, clear, neighbourly warning that Canada is prepared to impose export duties on oil and gas exports to the United States," he said.


The net result of Jack Layton's tariff war would be to cripple the British Columbia forestry sector, losing thousands of NDP votes in the bargain, while enriching Alberta oil interests and not getting a single vote in return.

But no one ever accused Jack Layton of acting in his own best political interests when there were headlines to be made.

2 comments:

Civitatensis said...

To say nothing of the impact on Alberta and the rest of the country. It's mostly Alberta's resources that he wants to use in his little war, though. Why doesn't he say Ontario minivans. Yeah, we'll stop selling Odysseys and Siennas to America, and stop the Maple Syrup pipeline while we're at it. I am not defending Martin's ineptitude, but a trade war will not serve Canada.

RP. said...

The net result of Jack Layton's tariff war would be to cripple the British Columbia forestry sector, losing thousands of NDP votes in the bargain, while enriching Alberta oil interests and not getting a single vote in return.

These are puzzling conclusions. If the tax doesn't affect the price of wood, how would it affect the forestry industry? And how would the Alberta oil interests be enriched by a tax imposed by the federal government?